A Compendium of Programs in Africa

This compendium describes how 31 programs in Africa are using gender strategies to improve HIV services and reduce vulnerability to HIV infection. Click on the tabs below to see how these programs are combining strategies, where gaps exist, what lessons were learned, and common experiences across programs.

From these 31 programs, 5 were selected as subjects of in-depth case studies. The five case studies and the resulting findings report are integrated into the compendium below, or you can view the whole Africa Gender Compendium Case Study Series.

View the Africa Gender Compendium Case Study Series Findings Report

What is the Compendium?

The public health and international development communities have known for nearly two decades that gender – the way in which societies define acceptable roles, responsibilities and behaviors of women and men – strongly influences HIV vulnerability and how people respond to the epidemic. There is growing recognition that using multiple approaches in HIV/AIDS programming is more effective than single strategies.

Recognizing the many links between gender and the continuing global AIDS epidemic, the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) advocates for the inclusion of gender strategies in HIV prevention, treatment, and care and support programs around the world.

Despite increased understanding of the link between gender and HIV and, more recently, the value of using multiple gender strategies to mitigate women’s and men’s vulnerability, little is known about how HIV programs are applying these insights to improve programs and services. To expand this knowledge base, PEPFAR’s Gender Technical Working Group commissioned AIDSTAR-One to compile a compendium of HIV prevention, treatment, and care and support programs in sub-Saharan Africa that are integrating multiple gender strategies into their work.

The resulting compendium describes how 31 programs in Africa are using gender strategies to improve HIV services and reduce vulnerability to HIV infection. The compendium provides examples of how strategies are combined, where gaps exist, lessons learned, and common experiences across programs.

From these 31 programs, five were selected as subjects of in-depth case studies. Click on the links to the right to view the interactive case studies.

 

Summary of Findings

Many HIV programs have begun integrating multiple gender strategies.

Programs reported numerous benefits of using gender strategies in combination.

Multiple gender strategies are most common in prevention, care and support HIV programming. They are least common in treatment programs.

Addressing gender-based violence is a key strategy to reducing HIV risk.

Increasing women’s legal protection was the least developed of the four gender strategies.

Community involvement and participatory approaches may contribute significantly to program sustainability.

Involving men is a challenge that can be met with innovative approaches.

Case Studies
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